Neelaratri, First Ever Malayalam Silent Thriller, To Hit Screens On December 29 – News18

Joby Mathew is the producer under the WJ Productions banner.

Joby Mathew is the producer under the WJ Productions banner.

Neelaratri is a cinematic exploration of the fast-paced lifestyle and challenges faced by the new generation.

The suspense thriller film Neelaratri is set to make Malayalam cinema history as it premieres on December 29. Ashok Nair, known for his work on Sawari starring Suraj Venjaramood and Dilip Ennilar, serves as the writer and director for this groundbreaking movie.

SB Prajith is in charge of cinematography for the film, featuring Bhagat Manuel, Hima Shankari, Vaiga, Vinod Kumar, Sumesh Surendran, and Baby Vedika. Neelaratri is a cinematic exploration of the fast-paced lifestyle and challenges faced by the new generation. The movie unfolds various events occurring within a single day and night. Joby Mathew is the producer under the WJ Productions banner.

Arun Raj is handling the music, with Sunny Jacob as the editor. Akhil Sadanandan and Anoop Venugopal serve as executive producers, while Nobin Varghese, Sirajuddin, and Manuel Lalbin take on the role of line producers. Vinod Paravoor is the production controller, and Anish Gopal is responsible for the art.

Similarly, Karthik Subbaraj’s Mercury holds significance in Tamil cinema history as the second silent film produced after the conclusion of the silent era. The first silent film post that era was Kamal Haasan’s Pesum Padam (also known as Pushpaka Vimana). The silent era, spanning from 1916 to 1934, witnessed the creation of approximately 124 silent films in South India, as documented by film historian Theodore Baskaran.

Following the advent of sound and the onset of the talkies era, Indian cinema largely moved away from silent films until Kamal Haasan’s groundbreaking Pushpaka Vimana. This marked a resurgence of silent cinema in Tamil, with approximately 54 years passing before another silent film was produced. It’s worth noting that there’s a distinction between the silent films of the silent era, where even sound and music were absent, and modern silent films. In contemporary silent films, music is incorporated, leading them to be referred to as ‘sound films.’