38-year-old ex-Miss Liverpool released from prison after late night smash – Henry’s Club

A former Miss Liverpool crashed her Mercedes, fled the scene and reported the car as stolen, to avoid a prison sentence and a driving ban.

Victoria McInerney caused thousands of pounds of damage when she smashed a set of traffic lights on a main road and falsely claimed a thief was behind the wheel. He happily punched him in the air today after being released from court over Tuesday’s incident.

The sales director and Pilates studio owner were also allowed to keep their driving license. Liverpool Crown Court heard that the accident occurred on 21 January this year at around 4 a.m. on Polton Road, Wirral.

McInerney of Netherton later told a taxi driver: ‘My boyfriend is going to kill me. Look what I have done with the car.’


Former Miss Liverpool, Victoria McInerney, pictured outside Liverpool Magistrates Court, escaped prison and a driving ban after perverting the course of justice and leaving the scene of an accident.

Ms McInerney was also asked to pay £2,055 in compensation to the Wirral Council, £500 in court costs and £95 for the victim.  He also got seven penalty points.  She was given 12 months of community order with 80 hours of unpaid work and 10 days of rehabilitation activity required

Ms McInerney was also asked to pay £2,055 in compensation to Wirral Council, £500 in court costs and £95 as victim surcharge. He also got seven penalty points. She was given 12 months of community order with 80 hours of unpaid work and 10 days of rehabilitation activity required

But the 38-year-old – who competed for the Miss England title as a teenager in 2003 when she was an aspiring model and singer – left the field before police and paramedics arrived. At nine o’clock in the morning, he himself called the force and informed that the company’s vehicle has been taken during the theft.

The ‘award-winning dancer’ told officers she had stayed overnight at her then-boyfriend’s home on nearby Deveraux Drive, arrived shortly before 8 p.m. and left her vehicle with the keys parked outside on the front porch. left close. She said that she went to sleep at 11 pm and saw that her car was gone.

But subsequent inquiries revealed CCTV footage of the accident, which was played in court and showed McInerney exiting the driver’s side door. Police returned to the address the same day at lunchtime, at which point he confessed that he had invented the story.

The driver said she was unable to sleep and was on her way to the garage to buy cigarettes when she ‘lost control’ of the car. Manor Drive’s McInerney was ‘nervous’ then because she ‘didn’t want to lose her job’.

Defending, Michael Scholes told the court that his client served as a caregiver for several family members and had a history of physical and mental health problems. He also described her as a ‘hardworking, responsible and well thought-out young lady’.

Mr Scholes said: ‘There was a significant degree of brain fog. The extremely bad decision taken is so out of character that it suggests that there may be other factors beyond the desire to avoid responsibility.

‘He is in a position to compensate. It is entirely reasonable to suggest that she will never trouble the courts again and that she has the potential to have a productive future.

‘He’s just the last person you’d expect to see before the courts for this type of crime. Sometimes people make mistakes, and some mistakes have more serious consequences than others.’

McInerney – who has no previous conviction – pleaded guilty to subverting the course of justice and failing to stop after an accident and sentenced him to 12 months with 80 hours of unpaid work and 10 days of rehabilitative activity was needed. community system. He was awarded seven penalty points, but was allowed to remain on the streets after requesting ‘significant hardship’ due to the effect of any disqualification on his job.

Sentencing, Judge Lewis Brandon said: ‘You knowingly gave false information to the police, and you did so in circumstances where you would have considered it before committing it. You wasted valuable resources when they could be used elsewhere.

‘It is clear that you are someone who is held in high esteem by anyone who knows you. You are impeccable and of positive good character.

‘You deeply regret what you did. In a panic, you didn’t think about the consequences of your actions.

‘You have time to reflect and take responsibility. I accept that there were other factors at play, and it was not about escaping responsibility.

These types of crimes undermine the nature of the criminal justice system.

‘But I highly doubt that we will see you again in this court. You have never been before the courts before, and you have not taken any risk to the public in my decision.’

McInerney was also asked to pay £2,055 in compensation to Wirral Council, £500 in court costs and a £95 victim surcharge.